Undergraduates


The biosciences at UW–Madison offer an incredible array of possibilities for undergraduates, including over 35 different majors. The Institute for Biology Education can help you find the path that's right for you, so you can explore, engage, and excel.

Explore

The first step in finding your path is exploring the range of possibilities available to you as a young scientist.

  • Exploring Biology is a course specifically designed for first-year students interested in the biosciences. It exposes students to the richness of bioscience research at UW–Madison, gives an overview of the "big ideas" of biology, and helps students learn more about career options in the biosciences.
  • If you're interested in biology but aren't sure which biology major is right for you, explore the resources on this site and make an appointment with the Institute's Biological Sciences Advisor, who can help you identify your interests and goals, narrow your search, and connect you with the additional information you need.
  • If you are a new student just starting at UW–Madison, we have a New/Prospective Students section of this website with resources just for you.

Engage and Excel

When you're doing what you love, you can really stand out and shine, so giving your interests and passions some room to grow is a great way to find and pursue your own unique excellence. Your undergraduate career isn't just about what happens in the classroom, and we encourage you to take advantage of opportunities for research, service learning, study abroad, leadership & involvement, and internships. These experiences can round out your program and give you an advantage after you graduate, whether you pursue a  career right away or go on to graduate or professional school.

In addition to offering services that help undergraduates connect with resources across campus, the Institute for Biology Education offers some unique programs and courses to help undergraduates get more involved:

NEW! Check out our blog for biosciences undergraduates.

photos courtesy of University Communications